Effect of different parenteral lipid emulsions on liver function

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“In this case study, we demonstrate the effects of different lipid emulsions on liver function in a 52-year-old woman with short bowel syndrome who was totally dependent on parenteral nutrition” Weng and Chen (2015).

Reference:

Weng, C.C. and Chen, Y. (2015) Effects of different parenteral nutrition infusions in a patient with short bowel syndrome. Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 24(1), p.184-7.

Abstract:

In this case study, we demonstrate the effects of different lipid emulsions on liver function in a 52-year-old woman with short bowel syndrome who was totally dependent on parenteral nutrition. Over a 13-month period after small bowel resection and jejunostomy, we followed the patient’s plasma triglycerides and liver enzyme levels as well as body weight and discomfort levels. During the first 3 months when parenteral nutrition including a lipid emulsion containing 50% soybean oil/50% medium-chain triglyerides was administered daily, the patient reported feeling unwell (experiencing dizziness and palpitations) and her triglycerides and liver enzyme levels rose to 366 mg/dL and 145 U/L (alanine aminotransferase [ALT]), respectively; these levels recovered when this emulsion was discontinued. For the following 9 months, an emulsion containing 80% olive oil and 20% soybean oil was administered, and the patient’s triglycerides (182 mg/dL) did not increase to abnormal levels and liver enzyme levels were only mildly elevated (109 U/L). The patient felt well and her body weight increased from 51 kg to 55 kg during this period. These results suggest that parenteral nutrition with a reduced soybean oil content may better preserve liver function in patients with short bowel syndrome.

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