Effect of in-line infusion filtering on in-line pressure monitoring

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“Placement of an infusion filter does not have a significant effect on the in-line pressure monitoring and has no adverse effect on detecting pressure-related complications of IV administration.” Jonkers et al (2014).

Reference:

Jonckers, T., Berger, I., Kuijten, T., Meijer, E. and Andriessen, P. (2014) The effect of in-line infusion filtering on in-line pressure monitoring in an experimental infusion system for newborns. Neonatal Network. 33(3), p.133-7.

Abstract:

Aim: To study the effect of in-line filtering on in-line pressure measurement in a simulated infusion system.

Methods: The experimental setup consisted of a syringe pump, syringe, intravenous (IV) line, and extension line. For aqueous fluids, a 0.2-μm infusion filter was used, and for lipid emulsions, a 1.2-μm filter. Infusion speed varied from 0.5 to 10.0 mL/h. First, the effect of clamping the extension line was studied on reaching alarm threshold. Second, the effect of aqueous and lipid fluids was evaluated on in-line pressure measurements.

Results: In-line placement of an infusion filter did not prolong the time to alarm threshold after occlusion. During 24 hours of monitoring, lipid emulsions and all-in-one admixture only caused a moderate increase in in-line pressure.

Conclusion: Placement of an infusion filter does not have a significant effect on the in-line pressure monitoring and has no adverse effect on detecting pressure-related complications of IV administration.

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