Decontamination regimen reduces catheter-related bloodstream infections

0

Implementation of this safe and effective topical decontamination regimen enhances routine CRBSI-prevention measures for haematology patients requiring central venous line insertion” Samuelson et al (2017).

Abstract:

OBJECTIVES: To assess impact of a topical decontamination regimen on rates of catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI) in intensively-treated haematology patients.

METHODS: A historically-controlled cohort study was used to evaluate the effect of applying chlorhexidine or Octenisan® body washes and nasal Prontoderm® ointment for 5 days around the time of Hickman line insertion on the incidence of CRBSI and infection-free catheter time. Lines inserted during a 24 month period prior to implementation of the decolonisation regimen were compared with those inserted during a 12 month period after the intervention was applied.

RESULTS: During the post-intervention period, 163 lines were inserted in 147 patients, compared to 303 lines in 242 patients in the pre-intervention period. CRBSI rates in treated and untreated patients respectively were 6.8 and 35.0 cases per 10,000 line-days by 21 days (p = 0.009), and 14.4 and 26.0 cases respectively per 10,000 line-days by 180 days (p = 0.025). The incidence rate of Staphylococcus aureus CRBSI in treated and untreated patients were 0.0 and 4.6 cases per 10,000 line-days respectively (p = 0.012). Multivariable Cox regression estimated an 81% probability (95% confidence interval 74% – 85%) that a treated line develops a CRBSI later than an untreated line by 21 days post-insertion.

CONCLUSIONS: Implementation of this safe and effective topical decontamination regimen enhances routine CRBSI-prevention measures for haematology patients requiring central venous line insertion.

Reference:

Samuelson, C., Kaur, H., Kritsotakis, E., Goode, S.D., Nield, A. and Partridge, D. (2017) A daily topical decontamination regimen reduces catheter-related bloodstream infections in haematology patients. The Journal of Infection. November 7th. [epub ahead of print].

doi: 10.1016/j.jinf.2017.10.014.

Thank you to our partners for supporting IVTEAM

Share.

Comments are closed.

Free Email Updates
Join 5.5K IVTEAM members. Subscribe now and be the first to receive all the latest free updates from IVTEAM!
100% Privacy. We don't spam.