Decontamination regimen reduces catheter-related bloodstream infections

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Implementation of this safe and effective topical decontamination regimen enhances routine CRBSI-prevention measures for haematology patients requiring central venous line insertion” Samuelson et al (2017).

Abstract:

OBJECTIVES: To assess impact of a topical decontamination regimen on rates of catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI) in intensively-treated haematology patients.

METHODS: A historically-controlled cohort study was used to evaluate the effect of applying chlorhexidine or Octenisan® body washes and nasal Prontoderm® ointment for 5 days around the time of Hickman line insertion on the incidence of CRBSI and infection-free catheter time. Lines inserted during a 24 month period prior to implementation of the decolonisation regimen were compared with those inserted during a 12 month period after the intervention was applied.

RESULTS: During the post-intervention period, 163 lines were inserted in 147 patients, compared to 303 lines in 242 patients in the pre-intervention period. CRBSI rates in treated and untreated patients respectively were 6.8 and 35.0 cases per 10,000 line-days by 21 days (p = 0.009), and 14.4 and 26.0 cases respectively per 10,000 line-days by 180 days (p = 0.025). The incidence rate of Staphylococcus aureus CRBSI in treated and untreated patients were 0.0 and 4.6 cases per 10,000 line-days respectively (p = 0.012). Multivariable Cox regression estimated an 81% probability (95% confidence interval 74% – 85%) that a treated line develops a CRBSI later than an untreated line by 21 days post-insertion.

CONCLUSIONS: Implementation of this safe and effective topical decontamination regimen enhances routine CRBSI-prevention measures for haematology patients requiring central venous line insertion.

Reference:

Samuelson, C., Kaur, H., Kritsotakis, E., Goode, S.D., Nield, A. and Partridge, D. (2017) A daily topical decontamination regimen reduces catheter-related bloodstream infections in haematology patients. The Journal of Infection. November 7th. .

doi: 10.1016/j.jinf.2017.10.014.

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