Central venous access device-associated thrombosis with aortic embolism

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This is the first case of a very preterm infant with pre-existing intraventricular haemorrhage, who developed a CVAD-associated thrombosis and thromboembolic complications” Biermayr et al (2016).

Abstract:

BACKGROUND: Thrombosis in neonates is commonly a central venous access device (CVAD) associated complication. Furthermore, a patent foramen ovale (PFO) is frequently seen in preterm infants. Even though a coincidence of both is not unusual, detaching of the thrombus and organisation of an aortic embolism has not been described until now. Treatment recommendations of CVAD-associated thrombosis in neonates do not consider frequently seen complications of preterm infants e.g. intraventricular haemorrhage. This is the first case of a very preterm infant with pre-existing intraventricular haemorrhage, who developed a CVAD-associated thrombosis and thromboembolic complications.

CASE PRESENTATION: The authors report on a very preterm girl with a pre-existing intraventricular haemorrhage and a CVAD-associated thrombus that, after removal of the CVAD, led to assumed pulmonary embolism and to an extended aortic embolism with consequent cerebral stroke. The girl was treated with unfractionated heparin (UFH) for about 50 days. During the further in-hospital stay the girl developed a mild bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Follow-up revealed clinical signs of cerebral palsy.

CONCLUSION: Even though preterm infants are often diagnosed with a PFO which constitutes the risk for paradoxical embolism, such complications do not occur frequently due to the physiological heart pressure proportion. Nevertheless, it is important to monitor vital parameters and cerebral perfusion after removing a CVAD with confirmed associated thrombosis, because thromboembolic complications are possible. If practicable, patients with a confirmed CVAD-associated thrombosis should be anticoagulated before removing the CVAD. However, in our patient it was rational to remove the CVAD without prior anticoagulation due to the pre-existing intraventricular haemorrhage. There are various treatment recommendations for thrombosis or embolism in infants. However, there are no clear recommendations in very preterm infants with a high risk of cerebral bleeding respectively a pre-existing intraventricular haemorrhage. We decided to treat our patient with unfractionated heparin until the affected vessels were recanalised. Finally, it remains a case-by-case decision how to treat CVAD-associated thrombosis and consequent embolism depending on the patient’s medical history.

Full Text

Reference:

Biermayr, M., Brunner, B., Maurer, K., Trawoeger, R., Kiechl-Kohlendorfer, U. and Neubauer, V. (2016) Case report of a central venous access device-associated thrombosis with aortic embolism in a preterm infant. BMC Pediatrics. 16(1), p.154.

doi: 10.1186/s12887-016-0691-x.

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