Antimicrobial central venous catheter

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Lorente, L., Lecuona, M., Ramos, M.J., Jimenez, A., Mora, M.L. and Sierra, A. (2008) The use of rifampicin-miconazole-impregnated catheters reduces the incidence of femoral and jugular catheter-related bacteremia. Clinical Infectious Diseases. 47(9), p.1171-5.

Abstract:

BACKGROUND: The guidelines of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention do not recommend the use of an antimicrobial- or antiseptic-impregnated catheter for short-term use. In previous studies, we have found a higher incidence of central venous catheter-related bacteremia among patients with femoral and central jugular accesses than among patients with other venous accesses.

OBJECTIVE: The objective of our study was to determine the incidence of central venous catheter-related bacteremia associated with rifampicin-miconazole-impregnated catheters and standard catheters in patients with femoral and central jugular venous accesses.

METHODS: This was a cohort study, conducted in the 24-bed polyvalent medical-surgical intensive care unit of a university hospital. We included patients who were admitted to the intensive care unit from 1 June 2006 through 30 September 2007 and who underwent femoral or central jugular venous catheterization.

RESULTS: We inserted 184 femoral (73 rifampicin-miconazole-impregnated catheters and 111 standard catheters) and 241 central jugular venous catheters (114 rifampicin-miconazole-impregnated catheters and 127 standard catheters). We found a lower rate of central venous catheter-related bacteremia associated with rifampicin-miconazole-impregnated catheters than with standard catheters among patients with femoral access (0 vs. 8.62 cases per 1000 catheter-days; odds ratio, 0.13; 95% confidence interval, 0.00-0.86; P = .03) and among patients with central internal jugular access (0 vs. 4.93 cases per 1000 catheter-days; odds ratio, 0.13; 95% confidence interval, 0.00-0.93; P = .04).

CONCLUSIONS: Rifampicin-minonazole-impregnated catheters are associated with a statistically significant reduction in the incidence of catheter-related bacteremia in patients with short-term catheter use at the central jugular and femoral sites.

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Lorente, L., Lecuona, M., Ramos, M.J., Jimenez, A., Mora, M.L. and Sierra, A. (2008) The use of rifampicin-miconazole-impregnated catheters reduces the incidence of femoral and jugular catheter-related bacteremia. Clinical Infectious Diseases. 47(9), p.1171-5.

Abstract:

BACKGROUND: The guidelines of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention do not recommend the use of an antimicrobial- or antiseptic-impregnated catheter for short-term use. In previous studies, we have found a higher incidence of central venous catheter-related bacteremia among patients with femoral and central jugular accesses than among patients with other venous accesses. OBJECTIVE: The objective of our study was to determine the incidence of central venous catheter-related bacteremia associated with rifampicin-miconazole-impregnated catheters and standard catheters in patients with femoral and central jugular venous accesses. METHODS: This was a cohort study, conducted in the 24-bed polyvalent medical-surgical intensive care unit of a university hospital. We included patients who were admitted to the intensive care unit from 1 June 2006 through 30 September 2007 and who underwent femoral or central jugular venous catheterization. RESULTS: We inserted 184 femoral (73 rifampicin-miconazole-impregnated catheters and 111 standard catheters) and 241 central jugular venous catheters (114 rifampicin-miconazole-impregnated catheters and 127 standard catheters). We found a lower rate of central venous catheter-related bacteremia associated with rifampicin-miconazole-impregnated catheters than with standard catheters among patients with femoral access (0 vs. 8.62 cases per 1000 catheter-days; odds ratio, 0.13; 95% confidence interval, 0.00-0.86; P = .03) and among patients with central internal jugular access (0 vs. 4.93 cases per 1000 catheter-days; odds ratio, 0.13; 95% confidence interval, 0.00-0.93; P = .04). CONCLUSIONS: Rifampicin-minonazole-impregnated catheters are associated with a statistically significant reduction in the incidence of catheter-related bacteremia in patients with short-term catheter use at the central jugular and femoral sites.

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