Process-oriented feedback for ultrasound-guided central venous catheter placement

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The proposed approach was applied to analyze a real case of ultrasound-guided Central Venous Catheter placement training” Lira et al (2019).

Abstract:

Developing high levels of competence in the execution of surgical procedures through training is a key factor for obtaining good clinical results in healthcare. To improve the effectiveness of the training, it is advisable to provide feedback to each student tailored to how the student has performed the procedure on each occasion. Current state-of-the-art feedback is based on Checklists and Global Rating Scales, which indicate whether all process steps have been carried out and the quality of each execution step. However, there is a process perspective that is not captured successfully by these instruments, e.g., steps performed, but in an undesired order, group of activities that are repeated an unnecessary number of times, or an excessive transition time between two consecutive steps. In this research, we propose a novel use of process mining techniques to effectively identify desired and undesired process patterns regarding rework, the order in which activities are performed, and time performance, in order to complement the tailored feedback for surgical procedures using a process perspective. The proposed approach was applied to analyze a real case of ultrasound-guided Central Venous Catheter placement training. It was quantitatively and qualitatively validated that the students who participated in the training program perceived the process-oriented feedback they received as favorable for their learning.

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Reference:

Lira, R., Salas-Morales, J., Leiva, L., Fuente, R., Fuentes, R., Delfino, A., Nazal, C.H., Sepúlveda, M., Arias, M., Herskovic, V. and Munoz-Gama, J. (2019) Process-Oriented Feedback through Process Mining for Surgical Procedures in Medical Training: The Ultrasound-Guided Central Venous Catheter Placement Case. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 16(11), p.E1877. doi: 10.3390/ijerph16111877.

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