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"In a survey sent to facilities utilizing nIR technology, 48% of respondents incorporated nIR in nurse-driven protocols. Of these respondents, 88% reported improvement in patient satisfaction, 92% saw a reduction in escalations, and 79% reported a reduction in hospital-acquired infections associated with PIVC placement" Fraifeld and Thompson (2023).

Near infrared vein visualization technology for peripheral IV access

Abstract:

Placement of peripheral intravenous catheters (PIVCs) is a frequent occurrence. Yet, PIVCs consistently require multiple attempts for successful cannulation, leading to an increased use of resources and risk of complications. Even though hospitals have established vascular access teams to improve outcomes and increase longevity of PIVCs, not every facility has one, and some struggle to meet demand. In these cases, PIVC placement depends on the confidence and skills of bedside nurses. Difficult access risk identification tools, as well as vein visualization technologies, like near infrared (nIR), have been developed to assist nurses with cannulation. This study sought to explore how hospitals are using vein visualization technology in nurse-driven protocols and to evaluate whether the technology is being meaningfully integrated into venous assessment and PIVC access protocols. In a survey sent to facilities utilizing nIR technology, 48% of respondents incorporated nIR in nurse-driven protocols. Of these respondents, 88% reported improvement in patient satisfaction, 92% saw a reduction in escalations, and 79% reported a reduction in hospital-acquired infections associated with PIVC placement. Integrating vein visualization technology into nurse-driven PIVC placement protocols has the potential to make a positive impact but requires future research to reproduce these findings in clinical studies.


Reference:

Fraifeld A, Thompson JA. Incorporating Near Infrared Light Vein Visualization Technology Into Peripheral Intravenous Access Protocols. J Infus Nurs. 2023 Nov-Dec 01;46(6):313-319. doi: 10.1097/NAN.0000000000000523. PMID: 37920105.