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"We created a prototype of a CV port using a 3D printer. Three red light-emitting diodes (LEDs) were attached around the septum that made the puncture site visible by applying wireless energy transmission technology using electromagnetic resonance" Yasutomi et al (2023).

Prototype LED implantable port identification

Abstract:

Implantable central venous (CV) ports are widely used for chemotherapy and parenteral nutrition. Generally, CV ports are used safely; however, some patients suffer from drug leakage around the port septum due to mispuncture. Therefore, we developed a CV port that is visible under the skin. We created a prototype of a CV port using a 3D printer. Three red light-emitting diodes (LEDs) were attached around the septum that made the puncture site visible by applying wireless energy transmission technology using electromagnetic resonance. The CV port was implanted under the skin of pork rose meat. The thickness of the skin of pork loin was measured. Fifteen medical doctors participated in the study to visually confirm the lighted CV port. The visibility of the center of the septum with and without lights was scored 0 as non-diagnostic; 1, slightly visible; 2, well visible; and 3, obviously visible. The visibility with or without lights was assessed. The relationship between the years of experience and the visibility score was assessed. The Wilcoxon test was used for statistical analysis. LEDs were easily transmitted through the skin of pork rose meat. The median visibility scores with or without lights were 2 (range, 1-3) and 3 (range, 1-3), respectively (p = 0.005). No significant relationship was found between experience and visibility score (p = 0.289). CV ports with LEDs can be easily recognized compared with those without LEDs. This technique may contribute to medical safety by improving its visibility to avoid mispuncture.


Reference:

Yasutomi M, Yunaiyama D, Takara Y, Saguchi T, Nakai M, Saito K. Application of wireless energy transmission technology into central venous ports with light-emitting diodes. Lasers Med Sci. 2023 Sep 13;38(1):212. doi: 10.1007/s10103-023-03867-2. PMID: 37702826.