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"To identify the occurrences related to peripheral venipuncture and hypodermoclysis among patients hospitalized in a general hospital and in an exclusive hospital institution for the care of patients in palliative cancer care" Bolela et al (2022).
Hypodermoclysis or IV infusion in palliative care

Abstract:

Objective: to identify the occurrences related to peripheral venipuncture and hypodermoclysis among patients hospitalized in a general hospital and in an exclusive hospital institution for the care of patients in palliative cancer care.

Method: an observational, descriptive and multicenter study. The consecutive and non-probabilistic sample consisted of 160 cancer patients hospitalized in Palliative Care. The outcome variable corresponded to the occurrences and complications related to each type of puncture. A questionnaire containing the sociodemographic and clinical variables and a structured script for monitoring and daily evaluation of the puncture were used. Descriptive statistics were employed for data analysis.

Results: the occurrences related to venipuncture at a general hospital were blood soiling at catheter insertion (17.4%) and expired use period (15.8%), while at a specific service for the care of patients under palliative care they were expired use period (32%) followed by infiltration (18.9%). As for hypodermoclysis, there were two subcutaneous punctures with phlogistic signs (1.0%) at the general hospital and a hematoma at the catheter insertion site (0.5%). At the specific service for the care of patients under palliative care there were three subcutaneous punctures with phlogistic signs (5.7%).

Conclusion: the number of occurrences related to peripheral venipuncture was higher than those related to hypodermoclysis.

Reference:

Bolela F, Lima R, Souza AC, Moreira MR, Lago AJO, Simino GPR, Araújo JS. Cancer patients in Palliative Care: occurrences related to venipuncture and hypodermoclysis. Rev Lat Am Enfermagem. 2022;30:e3623. doi: 10.1590/1518-8345.5825.3623. PMID: 35976356; PMCID: PMC9364775.