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"A lower incidence of infection-related mortality, persistent bacteremia, and recurrent bacteremia was found in patients early catheter removal; however the sample size was not adequate to detect statistical differences" Johns et al (2021).

Early CVC removal and CLABSI recurrence

Abstract:

Background: Hematology/oncology patients are at risk for central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSI). The purpose was to determine if infection-related mortality, persistent bacteremia, and recurrent bacteremia were decreased with early central venous catheter (CVC) removal.

Methods: A case-matched, retrospective cohort study was conducted comparing patients with early catheter removal (≤12 hours) to late catheter removal (>12 hours) in hematology/oncology patients with CLABSI from June 1, 2015 to May 31, 2018. Patients were case-matched based on intensive care unit admission and presence of shock to control for severity of illness.

Results/discussion: Of 148 patients meeting study inclusion, 128 (86.5%), had their CVC removed during hospitalization (median 11.8 hours). The majority had a hematologic malignancy (90.5%). Following case-matching, 48 patients remained in each group. The primary outcome of infection-related mortality, persistent bacteremia, or recurrent bacteremia occurred more frequently in the late catheter removal group compared to the early catheter removal group although this was not statistically significant (18.8% vs. 8.3%, p=0.136).

Conclusions: A lower incidence of infection-related mortality, persistent bacteremia, and recurrent bacteremia was found in patients early catheter removal; however the sample size was not adequate to detect statistical differences. Investigators should continue to evaluate if early catheter removal confers a benefit in a larger patient population.

Reference:

Johns J, Wahlrab L, Elefritz JL. Acutely ill hematology/oncology patients with central-line associated bloodstream infections and the impact of timing of catheter removal on outcomes. Am J Infect Control. 2021 Nov 11:S0196-6553(21)00724-0. doi: 10.1016/j.ajic.2021.10.038. Epub ahead of print. PMID: 34774897.