Cephalic vein approach for the implantable central venous access

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Long-term venous access is usually required in patients receiving chemotherapy. We hypothesized that, out of the various central line approach techniques, the cephalic vein cut-down technique can be a safe and simple alternative in terms of surgical safety, feasibility, cost-effectiveness, and functional outcomes” Rhu et al (2019).

Abstract:

Long-term venous access is usually required in patients receiving chemotherapy. We hypothesized that, out of the various central line approach techniques, the cephalic vein cut-down technique can be a safe and simple alternative in terms of surgical safety, feasibility, cost-effectiveness, and functional outcomes. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 569 patients who underwent implantable central venous access between January 2012 and December 2014 at our hospital.We classified our cohort according to access routes, as follows: 230 patients underwent subclavian vein access, 134 patients underwent internal jugular vein access, 25 patients underwent external jugular vein access, and 119 patients underwent cephalic vein access. The cephalic vein group had a significantly longer operation time than the subclavian group (P < .01); however, there was no difference in operation time between the internal jugular vein and cephalic vein groups (P = .59). The procedure-related complications and functional outcomes of the implanted venous port during chemotherapy were comparable between the cephalic group and other groups. Additionally, body mass index, operation time, and age did not correlate with catheter dysfunction in the multivariate logistic regression analysis (P = .53; P = .66; P = .19, respectively).We suggest that a cut-down central venous catheter insertion through the cephalic vein can be performed easily and safely with no differences in surgical and clinical outcomes compared to those of conventional percutaneous approaches. Moreover, the cephalic vein approach requires no specialized equipment, including percutaneous vascular kits, tunneling instruments, and intraoperative ultrasonography. Therefore, this technique might incur less medical expenses than conventional approaches and would be helpful for both patients and surgeons.

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Reference:

Rhu, J., Jun, K.W., Song, B.J., Sung, K. and Cho, J. (2019) Cephalic vein approach for the implantable central venous access: A retrospective review of the single institution’s experiences; Cohort Study. Medicine. 98(46), p.e18007. doi: 10.1097/MD.0000000000018007.

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