SHEA awards grant to study complications from home-based antibiotic therapy

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Keller will use human factors engineering principles and methods to complete a proactive risk assessment to identify ways in which Outpatient Parenteral Antimicrobial Therapy (OPAT) patients might be put at risk from central venous catheters in the home. OPAT – in which patients and their caregivers infuse parenteral antimicrobial therapy through central venous catheters – is a complicated home-based therapy received by 480,000 patients yearly” SHEA (2017).

SHEA report “As part of the 2017 Epi Project Competition, the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America Education and Research Foundation will fund research to identify human risk factors for complications from central venous catheters for patients who are self-administering at-home IV antibiotics. Sara Keller, MD, MPH, MSHP, Assistant Professor of Medicine at Johns Hopkins Hospital, was honored with the early investigator award at SHEA’s Spring 2017 Conference in St. Louis, MO.

“Improving the transition from the hospital to the home is critical. As patients and caregivers are providing more direct care, the field must consider how to best translate infection prevention guidelines for use in the home, while maintaining patient safety,” said Nasia Safdar, MD, Chair of the SHEA Research Committee. “Dr. Keller and other early investigators in the field are using their insight to evolve healthcare epidemiology and improve care in real-world settings.”

Keller will use human factors engineering principles and methods to complete a proactive risk assessment to identify ways in which Outpatient Parenteral Antimicrobial Therapy (OPAT) patients might be put at risk from central venous catheters in the home. OPAT – in which patients and their caregivers infuse parenteral antimicrobial therapy through central venous catheters – is a complicated home-based therapy received by 480,000 patients yearly. These patients are at risk of catheter complications, such as central line-associated bloodstream infection, 30-day readmission to the hospital, adverse drug events, and infection relapse.”

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