Material resists biofilm growth

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Intravenous news: InfectionControlToday.com report on the “tale of two biological substances — cells from mammals and bacteria. It’s a story about the havoc these microscopic entities can wreak on all manner of surfaces, from mighty ships to teeth and medical devices, and how two SyracuseUniversity researchers are discovering new ways to prevent the damage.

Under moist conditions, bacteria form what scientists call biofilms — a sticky, slimy buildup on almost any kind of surface. Biofilms can corrode the hulls of ships, produce green slime on rocks, pollute drinking water systems, form plaque on teeth and stick to medical devices implanted in humans, resulting in infection or rejection.

It’s critically important, therefore, for scientists to gain a better understanding of how biofilms are formed and use that knowledge to develop surfaces that will resist such biofouling. In an unusual, interdisciplinary collaboration, SU researchers have found that if you can prevent protein from sticking to a surface, you can prevent both bacteria and mammalian cells from doing likewise. In the process, they developed a novel surface technology that scientists can use to study biofilms in ways that were not previously possible”.

Click here for the full news story on InfectionControlToday.com

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