Review of a pocket-sized ultrasound device for internal jugular puncture

0

The aims of our study were to compare the performance of experienced emergency physicians for internal jugular vein puncture using a conventional ultrasound device versus a pocket-sized ultrasound in a training model” Chetioui et al (2018).

Abstract:

INTRODUCTION: The aims of our study were to compare the performance of experienced emergency physicians for internal jugular vein puncture using a conventional ultrasound device versus a pocket-sized ultrasound in a training model.

METHODS: In this single-center, prospective, randomized study, emergency physicians performed one puncture with each device in a randomized order. No emergency physicians used a pocket-sized ultrasound for central vascular catheter insertion in clinical practice. A medium-fidelity training model was used. Each image was judged based on an image quality scale from 0 to 5.

RESULTS: Twenty emergency physicians were included: nine females (45%), median experience 2.5 years [2.0;4.3]. The median time to achieve a puncture with the conventional ultrasound device was 22 s [17;26] versus 28 s [13;43] with the pocket-sized ultrasound ( p = 0.43). Eighteen (90%) emergency physician punctures were successful with the conventional ultrasound device versus 18 (90%) with the pocket-sized ultrasound ( p = 1). The image quality was 4 [3;5] in the conventional ultrasound device group versus 4 [3;5] in the pocket-sized ultrasound group ( p = 0.32).

CONCLUSION: Pocket-sized ultrasound and conventional ultrasound device performances are not statistically different for internal jugular vein-guided ultrasonography in a training model. These results must be confirmed in a clinical study.

You may also be interested in…





Reference:

Chetioui, A., Masia, T., Claret, P.G., Markarian, T., Muller, L., Lefrant, J.Y., de La Coussaye, J.E., Roger, C. and Bobbia, X. (2018) Pocket-sized ultrasound device for internal jugular puncture: A randomized study of performance on a simulation model. The Journal of Vascular Access. November 20th. .

doi: 10.1177/1129729818812733.

Share.

Comments are closed.