Retrospective study of 1,460 implanted venous access devices

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“Our retrospective study included 1,460 cases in which PCVAS was implanted in the 11 years between January 2002 and January 2013″ El Hammoumi, et al (2014)

References:

El Hammoumi, M., El Ouazni, M., Arsalane, A., El Oueriachi, F., Mansouri, H. and Kabiri, E.H. (2014) Incidents and Complications of Permanent Venous Central Access Systems: A Series of 1,460 Cases. The Korean Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery. 47(2), p.117-123.

Abstract:

BACKGROUND: Implanted venous access devices or permanent central venous access systems (PCVASs) are routinely used in oncologic patients. Complications can occur during the implantation or use of such devices. We describe such complications of the PCVAS and their management.

METHODS: Our retrospective study included 1,460 cases in which PCVAS was implanted in the 11 years between January 2002 and January 2013, including 810 women and 650 men with an average age of 45.2 years. We used polyurethane or silicone catheters. The site of insertion and the surgical or percutaneous procedure were selected on the basis of clinical data and disease information. The subclavian and cephalic veins were our most common sites of insertion.

RESULTS: About 1,100 cases (75%) underwent surgery by training surgeons and 360 patients by expert surgeons. Perioperative incidents occurred in 33% and 12% of these patients, respectively. Incidents (28%) included technical difficulties (n=64), a subcutaneous hematoma (n=37), pneumothoraces (n=15), and an intrapleural catheter (n=1). Complications in the short and medium term were present in 14.2% of the cases. Distortion and rupture of the catheter (n=5) were noted in the costoclavicular area (pinch-off syndrome). There were 5 cases of catheter migration into the jugular vein (n=1), superior vena cava (n=1), and heart cavities (n=3). No patient died of PCVAS insertion or complication.

CONCLUSION: PCVAS complications should be diagnosed early and treated with probable removal of this material for preventing any life-threatening outcome associated with complicated PVCAS.

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