How to prevent bloodstream infection in IV therapy and vascular access?

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Because it is so common, ensuring safe vascular access is an essential focus for all health professionals. All vascular access procedures are invasive, regardless of patient group, therapeutic rationale, the device used, route and site of insertion and particular technique” Hugill (2017).

Abstract:

Healthcare-associated infections (HAI) are one cause of preventable harm to patients, and are a clinical, political and economic concern. Vascular access, via a peripheral or central vascular device, is a routine experience for most patients receiving hospital care and is increasingly commonplace in health care at home. Because it is so common, ensuring safe vascular access is an essential focus for all health professionals.

All vascular access procedures are invasive, regardless of patient group, therapeutic rationale, the device used, route and site of insertion and particular technique. As such there are inherent risks of patient harm. Many of these risks are well known and include issues such as infiltration, extravasation, phlebitis and pain. Of particular importance is the relationship between intravenous (IV) therapy and infection and how best to prevent HAI, specifically in relation to IV therapy, bloodstream infections, catheter-related bloodstream infections and central-line associated blood stream infections. This article considers the interrelationship between IV therapy bloodstream infections and measures to prevent HAI and summarises key principles in this ongoing endeavour.

Reference:

Hugill, K. (2017) Preventing bloodstream infection in IV therapy. British Journal of Nursing. 26(14), p.S4-S10.

doi: 10.12968/bjon.2017.26.14.S4.

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