Effectiveness of antibiotic-impregnated PICC for CLABSI prevention

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Antimicrobial-impregnated (AIP) peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) may lower risk of central line–associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) compared with nonantimicrobial-impregnated (NAIP) catheters. We sought to assess risk factors for CLABSI with a focus on the effect of AIP PICCs” Kagan et al (2018).

Abstract:

Background: Antimicrobial-impregnated (AIP) peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) may lower risk of central line–associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) compared with nonantimicrobial-impregnated (NAIP) catheters. We sought to assess risk factors for CLABSI with a focus on the effect of AIP PICCs.

Methods: CLABSI rate was determined among patients who received PICCs from July 2009 through June 2012 using a retrospective study design. A nested case-control study matched for operators (interventional radiology [IR], infectious diseases , and the nurse venous access team ) was conducted to assess risks for PICC CLABSI.

Results: Eighty-nine PICC CLABSIs (1.66%) occurred among 5,372 PICC placements a mean of 32 days after placement. Higher infection risk (1.75) was observed for IR-placed PICCs compared with ID-placed PICCs (P = .02). In addition, higher infection risk (4.22) was observed for IR-placed PICCS compared with VAT-placed PICCs (P = .0008). IR-placed NAIP catheters, as indicated by multivariate analysis, revealed a 5.45-fold greater CLABSI risk compared with AIP catheters (P < .0005). Other risk factors included chemotherapy, placement of a tunneled catheter, leukemia, and AIDS. Conclusions: PICC CLABSIs were highest among patients receiving NAIP catheters in this large study. Highest risk occurred with placement of a tunneled catheter, AIDS, leukemia, and if the indication for PICC was chemotherapy. Our study suggests that the AIP PICC should be considered in all patients receiving PICCs.

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Reference:

Kagan, E., Salgado, C.D., Banks, A.L., Marculescu, C.E. and Cantey, J.R. (2018) Peripherally inserted central catheter–associated bloodstream infection: Risk factors and the role of antibiotic-impregnated catheters for prevention. American Journal of Infection Control. September 1st. .

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajic.2018.07.006

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