Device-associated infections rates in the Philippines

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Intravenous literature: Navoa-Ng, J.A., Berba, R., Galapia, Y.A., Rosenthal, V.D., Villanueva, V.D., Tolentino, M.C.V., Genuino, G.A.S., Consunji, R.J. and Mantaring, J.B.V. (2011) Device-associated infections rates in adult, pediatric, and neonatal intensive care units of hospitals in the Philippines: International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium (INICC) findings. AJIC: American Journal of Infection Control. 39(7), p.548-554.

Abstract:

Background – This study investigated the rate of device-associated health care–associated infection (DA-HAI), microbiological profiles, bacterial resistance, length of stay (LOS), and mortality rate in 9 intensive care units (ICUs) of 3 hospital members of the International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium (INICC) in the Philippines.

Methods – This was an open-label, prospective cohort, active DA-HAI surveillance study of adult, pediatric, and newborn patients admitted to 9 tertiary care ICUs in the Philippines between January 2005 and December 2009, implementing methodology developed by the INICC. Data collection was performed in the participating ICUs, and data were uploaded and analyzed at the INICC headquarters using proprietary software. DA-HAI rates were registered based on definitions promulgated by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Healthcare Safety Network.

Results – Over a 5-year period, 4952 patients hospitalized in ICUs for a total of 40,733 days acquired 199 DA-HAIs, for an overall rate of 4.9 infections per 1,000 ICU-days. Ventilator-associated pneumonia posed the greatest risk (16.7 per 1,000 ventilator-days in the adult ICUs, 12.8 per 1,000 ventilator-days in the pediatric ICU, and 0.44 per 1,000 ventilator-days in the neonatal ICUs), followed by central line–associated bloodstream infections (4.6 per 1,000 catheter-days in the adult ICUs, 8.23 per 1,000 ventilator-days in the pediatric ICU, and 9.6 per 1,000 ventilator-days in the neonatal ICUs) and catheter-associated urinary tract infections (4.2 per 1,000 catheter-days in the adult ICUs and 0.0 in the pediatric ICU).

Conclusion – DA-HAIs pose far greater threats to patient safety in Philippine ICUs than in US ICUs. The establishment of active infection control programs that involve infection surveillance and implement guidelines for prevention can improve patient safety and should become a priority.

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