Cost-effective strategies for CRBSI prevention

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“We must not forget that all patients who acquire a CRBSI were already receiving treatment for one or more other conditions, which is why they had the VAD in place.” Gabriel et al (2014).

Reference:

Gabriel, J., Hitchcock, J., Hodson, J., Masterton, R.G., Nicholls, M., Franklin, N. and Whitton, J. (2014) Catheter-related bloodstream infections: cost-effective strategies for prevention. British Journal of Nursing. 23(13), Supplement, p.S3-S22.

Abstract:

Most patients admitted to hospital will be the recipient of a peripheral vascular access device (VAD) or, to a much lesser extent, a central venous access device (CVAD), inserted to facilitate their treatment. A catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) is a potentially preventable complication of any VAD. In 2011, the most recent year for which data are available, the Health Protection Agency (HPA) estimated that 64% of all bloodstream infections occurred in patients who had a VAD in situ (HPA, 2011). The cost to the NHS of managing such infections is estimated to be in the region of £1 billion per annum (Plowman et al, 1999; HPA, 2011). This is in addition to the personal cost endured by each affected individual. We must not forget that all patients who acquire a CRBSI were already receiving treatment for one or more other conditions, which is why they had the VAD in place.

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