Cleaning open-lumen stopcock devices on central venous access devices

0

“Contamination of a central venous catheter may occur through use of conventional open-lumen stopcock devices (COLDs), or disinfectable, needleless, closed connectors (DNCCs).” Holroyd et al (2014).

Reference:

Holroyd, J.L., Paulus, D.A., Rand, K.H., Enneking, F.K., Morey, T.E. and Rice, M.J. (2014) Universal intravenous access cleaning device fails to sterilize stopcocks. Anesthesia and Analgesia. 118(2), p.333-43.

Abstract:

BACKGROUND: Contamination of a central venous catheter may occur through use of conventional open-lumen stopcock devices (COLDs), or disinfectable, needleless, closed connectors (DNCCs). We investigated the effectiveness of a new universal IV access cleaning device (Site-Scrub) compared with 70% isopropyl alcohol prep pads for sanitizing COLDs or DNCCs inoculated with common catheter-associated pathogens.

METHODS: Site-Scrub was compared with 70% alcohol prep pads for sanitizing contaminated female Luer lock COLD or DNCC filled with sterile saline or propofol and 2 common bacterial central venous catheter contaminants (Staphylococcus epidermidis or Pseudomonas aeruginosa). Devices were contaminated using a glove touch (COLD and DNCC) or syringe tip (COLD). The primary end point of the study was colony-forming units (CFU) after 24 hours.

RESULTS: The use of glove touch contamination, the contaminants, S epidermidis and P aeruginosa, produced CFU in saline-filled COLDs treated with the Site-Scrub, but not in those treated with alcohol pads (P < 0.001). Similar results were observed with propofol-filled COLDs (P < 0.001). For DNCCs filled with saline or propofol, both alcohol and Site-Scrub effectively reduced CFU growth compared with contaminated controls (P < 0.001). When COLDs were contaminated by treated syringe tips, there was no significant evidence of reduction in CFU growth by using either alcohol pads or Site-Scrub compared with contaminated controls.

CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest that when the inner surface of the COLD is contaminated, both alcohol pads and Site-Scrub were not significantly effective in decontaminating the COLD. When the COLD rim is contaminated, however, alcohol pads outperform Site-Scrub. DNCCs were uniformly decontaminated with either treatment. Future work should focus on better access systems because current COLDs are difficult to decontaminate.

Other intravenous and vascular access resources that may be of interest (External links – IVTEAM has no responsibility for content).

Main page

Share.

Comments are closed.

Free Email Updates
Join 5.5K IVTEAM members. Subscribe now and be the first to receive all the latest free updates from IVTEAM!
100% Privacy. We don't spam.