Blood culture result profile and antimicrobial resistance pattern

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The objective of this study was to evaluate patterns of bacterial isolates and local antimicrobial susceptibility patterns in neonatal sepsis” Sorsa et al (2019).

Abstract:

Background: Antimicrobial resistance is one of the major public health emergencies worldwide, and this trend didn’t spare developing countries like Ethiopia. The objective of this study was to evaluate patterns of bacterial isolates and local antimicrobial susceptibility patterns in neonatal sepsis.

Methods: A hospital based observational study was conducted from April 2016 to May 2017 in Asella teaching and referral hospital (ATRH). A total of 303 neonates with clinical sepsis were included. Collected data were entered into EPI-INFO version 3.5.1 for cleanup; and then exported to SPSS version 21 for further analysis. Frequencies and proportion were used to describe the study population in relation to relevant variables.

Results: Bacterial growth was detected in 88 (29.4%) of blood cultures. Predominantly isolated bacteria were coagulase negative staphylococci (CoNS) 22 (25%), Escherichia coli (E.Coli) 18 (20.5%) and Staphylococcus aureus 16 (18%). Resistance rates of S. aureus and CoNS against Ampicillin were 11 (69%) and 20 (91%) respectively. The resistance rate of E. coli against Ampicillin and Gentamycin were 12 (66.7%) and 10 (55.6%) while Klebsiella spp. resistance rate gets much higher against these two first line antibiotics [10 (91%) and 9 (82%) respectively]. Similarly, both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria isolates were also highly resistant to third generation Cephalosporins, and 63 (72%) isolated bacteria showed multidrug-resistance. However; Gram-positive bacteria isolates had better susceptibility patterns to third line antibiotics like Clindamycin, Vancomycin and Ciprofloxacin while Gram-negative isolates had a higher susceptibility to Ciprofloxacin and Amikacin.

Conclusion: CoNS, S. aureus, E. coli and Klebsiella spp. were the leading bacterial causes of neonatal sepsis in our study. They were highly resistant to first- and second-line empiric antimicrobial treatment used at NICU (Neonatal intensive care unit), reducing the antimicrobial choices for management of neonatal sepsis. Fortunately, the mentioned isolated bacteria remained susceptible to third line antibiotics used to treat neonatal sepsis.

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Reference:

Sorsa, A., Früh, J., Loraine, S. and Abdissa, S. (2019) Blood culture result profile and antimicrobial resistance pattern: a report from neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), Asella teaching and referral hospital, Asella, south East Ethiopia. Antimicrobial Resistance & Infection Control. 8, p.42.

https://doi.org/10.1186/s13756-019-0486-6

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