An example of hospital-wide surveillance of central line-associated bloodstream infections

0

CLABSIs are less common in general wards than in ICUs, but they are more often associated with long-term indwelling catheters. Therefore, interventions to prevent CLABSIs should be tailored according to the type of ward and type of catheter” Seo et al (2018).

Abstract:

BACKGROUND: Surveillance and interventions of central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs) had mainly been targeted in intensive care units (ICUs). Central lines are increasingly used outside ICUs. Therefore, we performed a hospital-wide survey of CLABSIs to evaluate the current status and develop strategies to reduce CLBASI rates.

METHODS: All hospitalized patients with central venous catheters (CVCs) were screened for CLABSIs from January 2014 through December 2015 at a 1,328 bed tertiary care teaching hospital in Korea using an electronic data-collecting system. Clinical information including type of CVC was collected. CLABSI rates were calculated using the definitions of the National Health and Safety Network after excluding mucosal barrier injury laboratory-confirmed bloodstream infection (BSI).

RESULTS: A total of 154 CLABSIs were identified, of which 72 (46.8%) occurred in general wards and 82 (53.2%) in ICUs (0.81 and 2.71 per 1,000 catheter days), respectively. Non-tunneled CVCs were most common (68.6%) among 70 CLABSI events diagnosed within one week of their maintenance. On the other hand, tunneled CVCs and peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) were more common (60.5%) among 114 CLABSI events diagnosed more than a week after maintenance. Whereas the majority (72.2%) of CLABSIs in ICUs were associated with non-tunneled CVCs, tunneled CVCs (38.9%) and PICCs (36.8%) were more common in general wards.

CONCLUSION: CLABSIs are less common in general wards than in ICUs, but they are more often associated with long-term indwelling catheters. Therefore, interventions to prevent CLABSIs should be tailored according to the type of ward and type of catheter.

You may also be interested in…


Full Text


Reference:

Seo, H.K., Hwang, J.H., Shin, M.J., Kim, S.Y., Song, K.H., Kim, E.S. and Kim, H.B. (2018) Two-Year Hospital-Wide Surveillance of Central Line-Associated Bloodstream Infections in a Korean Hospital. Journal of Korean Medical Science. November 5th. eCollection.

doi: 10.3346/jkms.2018.33.e280.

Share.

Comments are closed.